Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Francis of Assisi Catholic Church
7503 Peavine Road | Fairfield Glade, Tennessee 38558
Phone: 931-484-3628 | Email: stfrancis@frontiernet.net
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:30am-Noon & 1:00pm-3:30pm
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Saint Francis of Assisi
 
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Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil Mass 4:00pm
Sunday 8:00am & 10:00am
Communion Service: Monday 8:00am
Daily Mass: Tuesday - Friday 8:00am

Holy Day Masses
Vigil Mass 4:00pm
Holy Day 10:00am

Benediction
First Friday of each month after 8:00am Mass followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament until 9:30am.

Reconciliation
Saturday 3:30pm, Sunday 7:30am & 9:30am and also before daily Mass.
 
Welcome To Saint Francis of Assisi Catholic Church
Whether you are a parishioner or a visitor may you find the peace of Christ and abundant blessings in our church and among our parish family. Please call the parish office at 931-484-3628 to see how we can become part of your faith journey. We look forward to meeting you.
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Parish Mission
Guided by the love of Jesus Christ and in the spirit of our patron Saint Francis of Assisi, we seek to deepen our understanding of our Catholic faith and to bear witness with other churches to peace and justice through social outreach.

We also desire to provide a welcoming environment to all who come to worship God in word and sacrament and to live a spirituality that draws others to our spiritual home.
 
Calendar of Events
The First Creche
It was the year 1223. Saint Francis went to Rome to obtain from Pope Honorius III authorization to celebrate Christmas in a totally new way. Saint Francis chose a forest in the vicinity of the village of Greccio, in the region of Umbria, not too far from Rome, where a good friend of his lived, the noble Giovanni Velita.
About 15 days before Christmas, Saint Francis said to him: “If you want to celebrate the feast of the Divine birth in Greccio make haste to prepare what I indicate to you.
“So that we can properly remember the circumstances in which the Divine Child was born and all the inconveniences he endured as he lay in the manger on straw between an ox and a ass, I would like to re-create this in a palpable way, as if I had seen it with my own eyes.”
Many religious and the residents of Greccio and the surrounding area were all invited for this special commemoration. Just before midnight, the Franciscan friars went in procession to the spot chanting the antiphons of Advent. They were accompanied by the villagers who carried flaming torches.
The wind blew strongly and the light of the torches projected their flickering shadows on the dense forest. However, in the clearance where the crib had been set-up, there reigned an ambience of sacrality and peace; only the cold was a nuisance. When the village bell of Greccio began to toll midnight, a priest began to celebrate Mass. The altar had been placed in front of the crib with the ox and ass on either side. A beautiful full-size statue of the Child Jesus rested on the straw.
As is well known, Saint Francis never wanted to be ordained a priest out of humility. Because of this, as deacon, it was his duty to solemnly sing the Gospel of that Christmas Mass.
After the reading of the Gospel, all waited attentively to hear the sermon that Saint Francis himself gave on the grandeurs and mercies of the Savior of the human race, who that night was made flesh and dwelt among us.
Saint Francis spoke words with a supernatural sweetness about the poverty in which the God-man was born and about the insignificant city of Bethlehem. It is difficult to imagine the fiery love that the sweet, clear, and sonorous voice of Saint Francis produced in the hearts of those privileged to hear him.

The Miracle
At the end of his sermon, Saint Francis bent over to kiss the statue of the Divine Child. At this moment a miracle took place that only he and Giovanni Velita saw. The statue became alive. It was as if it had been woken from a profound sleep with Saint Francis’s kiss, and then the Child Jesus smiled at Saint Francis.
At the consecration, when the bread and wine truly become the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Saint Francis was able to contemplate the Messiah in two ways: in the form of the Holy Eucharist and laying in the manger.
At the end of the solemn midnight Mass, and after having incensed the manger, the friars returned to Greccio and the villagers to their homes. Everyone was full of supernatural joy.
The veracity of this event can be certified by the sanctity of the one who experienced it, as well as by the miracles that happened afterwards. The straw from the manger was carefully kept by the people and was an efficacious remedy to miraculously cure sick animals and an antidote against many other diseases.

A Tradition Is Born
This devout and hitherto unknown institution of the manger was enthusiastically received by the faithful. Saint Clare of Assisi established it in her convents. Every year she set-up the manger herself.
The Franciscan friars also spread this custom far and wide. Whether composed of figurines artistically carved from clay, porcelain, or wood, the crib became the very symbol of Christmas.
From the majestic cathedral to the simplest rural chapel, from the palace or mansion to the humblest abode, Catholics worldwide, since that time, have had the pious custom of setting up a manger. In this way they repeat the custom that Providence inspired from the seraphic Saint Francis of Assisi in the remote year of 1223.
 
Saint Francis of Assisi Catholic Church • 7503 Peavine Road • Fairfield Glade, TN 38558 • 931-484-3628